The Parent Package: A Case for Supporting Working Parents

Transforming the experience of working parents through bundled benefits.

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50 million parents are in today's workforce. Use the Parent Package to benchmark your parental leave programs and benefits.

Recent survey results from Ovia Health found that only 65% of women working at companies with 1,000+ employees feel supported in balancing their work and family lives.

New Moms Leaving the
Workorce

 28% - new moms leaving the workforce

Nearly 1 in 3 (28%) of women working for large employers do not return to their job once they have a baby. Nine percent of those women went to work for a new employer.

More Can Be Done to Retain New Moms

 40% say more can be done to retain new moms

Forty percent of women who left felt that their large employer could have done things differently to keep them, such as providing flexibility.

New Moms are Unaware of Maternity Benefits

 28% of women say they are unaware of benefits

Almost 30% of women working for large employers said their employer does not offer any maternity or family benefits, or if benefits are offered, they are unaware of them.

Sources: Ovia Health. Employee Benefits Survey Results (1,000+ employees). March 2018; Ovia Health. Motherhood in America Survey Results (1,000+ employees). 2017.

What Working Moms Want vs What They Have

And it’s not just birth mothers that encounter challenges juggling responsibilities at work and at home. It’s an issue that affects all working parents. That’s why today’s forward-thinking companies are strategically developing inclusive support for all parents — moms & dads, birth parents, adoptive parents & foster parents.

Parental Leave is Good for Business

 

84% of moms with 6 weeks of paid parental leave return to their employer

56% of moms with less than 6 weeks of paid parental leave return to their employer

 

Women with paid parental leave are more likely to return to work.

Parental leave can pay for itself

By taking a deep dive into the Ovia Health Motherhood in America survey results of associate- level employees working for large (1,000+) employers, it is clear that offering parental leave is a financially smart decision.

In this example, Company X could save $76,000/100 associate-level new moms by offering six weeks of paid parental leave in employee retention alone. Employers can tailor this example using their turnover cost for associate-level employees. According to the 2017 Work Institute Retention Report, turnover cost estimates range from $4,000 per employee to 1.5 times the employee’s salary. Employers see additional savings through tax credits, employee engagement, sustained productivity and customer service and improved health outcomes (for the mother and child), while creating a culture of trust and positive brand image. Company X has 100 new moms at the associate level, each making a salary of $52,000 ($1,000/week). The company grants new moms six weeks of paid parental leave.

Company X has 100 new moms at the associate level, each making a salary of $52,000 ($1,000/week). The company grants new moms six weeks of paid parental leave.

100 New Moms X $6,000 in Leave = $600,000

Based on the Ovia Health survey results, if Company X did not offer six weeks of paid parental leave, they’d lose 39 more new mom associates. For this example, a turnover cost of 33% of annual salary is used.

39 New Moms X $17,333 in Turnover Costs = $676,000

Employers can tailor this example using their turnover cost for associate-level employees. According to the 2017 Work Institute RetentionReport, turnover cost estimates range from $4,000 per employee to 1.5 times the employee’s salary.

Employers see additional savings through tax credits, employee engagement, sustained productivity and customer service and improved health outcomes (for the mother and child), while creating a culture of trust and positive brand image.

More Outcomes of Supporting Parents: Business Case Data with C-Suite Appeal

80% of US millennials say they're less likely to quit a job is parental leave is offered to both women and men
More than 90% of employers offering paid family medical leave felt hte effect was positive or neutral on profitability, productivity and morale
Women are more likely to breastfeed when they take maternity leave, and longer leave increases the likeliehood and duration
64% of women who left the workforce made the decision to leave before having a child
Women who took a maternity leave longer than 12 weeks reported fewer depressive symptons and, when leave was paid, an improvement in overall mental health
Fathers' early involvement leads to a more cohesive family life and reduced divorce rates. In addition, fathers who take time off around childborth are more likely ot be involved in child care later in the child's life
Breastfeeding is associated with reduced risk of health problems, such as asthma, obesity, Type 2 diabetes and sudden infant death syndrom

*The question “If you chose NOT to return to work after having a child/children, when did you first make that decision?” was asked to second time
moms of the Ovia Health Community.

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